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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be the civil rights case -- civil rights issue term, more so than in many past decades. >> pete, you mentioned the voting rights act there. specifically this deals with section 5, the preclearance provision. >> right. >> i have picking up from supporters of preclearance, i'm picking up on an awful lot of sort of negativity in terms of how they think this is disappearing to go. i guess roberts a couple years ago basically made a comment that things have changed in the south. >> exactly. >> we don't want to get too far ahead of ourselves, but if the court does toss section 5, what would be the larger impact on the entire voting rights act if that were to happen? >> the civil rights advocates would tell you section 5 is the real teeth. this is the thing that requires states to justify their changes in advance. the other part of the law would remain intact. that's the part of the law that allows anybody to sue a state if they believe it engages in racial discrimination at the polls. but civil rights advocates would say this just invites a game of whack a mole. that every time something pops up, th
in the 1700's which nobody would have ever predicted would end slavery 100 years later. the civil rights movement ups and downs. i think that it is important to always know that social movements are not simple narrative of arcs of one of success after another. it is not about occupying space. it is about confronting the enormous challenges we face in america and the globe. if we do not confront of these changes, we will not have a future. one way of thinking about maybe the history of the abs and a -- ebbs and flows of social movement is to say -- for those who write the demise of this movement, which there is always a gap or you can have hope. that is the importance of the beginning of the occupy movement. it actually is a source of hope that people responded to the changes in this country that really show that there are cracks that can be exploited. and i will stop. thank you. >> ok. >> nadine. >> she actually took my answer. [laughter] that's what i was going to say. so, there is some good overlap. i guess i will talk a bit about my experience with occupy and start off with a general
which nobody would have ever predicted would end slavery 100 years later. the civil rights movement sought ups and downs. i think that it is important to always know that social movements are not simple narrative of parks of one of success after another. -- arcs of success after another. it is not about occupying space. it is about confronting the enormous challenges we face in america and the globe. if we do not confront of these changes, we will not have a future. one way of thinking about maybe the history of the abs and a flows of social movement is to say -- for those who write the demise of this movement, which there is is always a gap or you can have hope. that is the importance of the beginning of the occupy movement. it actually is a source of hope that people responded to the changes in this country that really show that there are cracks that can be exploited. and i will stop. thank you. >> ok. >> she actually took my answer. [laughter] that's what i was going to say. so, there is some good overlap. i guess i will talk a bit about my experience with occupy and start off wi
starting point is where people are. it may be that labor is a spent force and that civil-rights organizations are spent forces and the community-based organizations are narrow minded and too anxious to just get a foundation grant for government low-income tax credit to build five units of housing and it will not change the system, but that is where people are. for the last four years i have been working with the building insurance, the widest part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try and get a young black and latino kids of color into the building trade so that they can become the green work force of the future. the building trade, conservative as they are, operates 1200 job training centers in the construction trade and is the second-largest mechanism outside the navy. guess what? they are actually in a coalition with youth bills, with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts, inner-city kids, working together for the last four years to say -- how do we change and improve? the national leadership of the building trade has gone across 350 c
of the spectrum. think about the civil rights movement, feminism, the various feminisms of the era, and, eventually, the gay and lesbian rights movement and other social movements that challenged the idea that there really is one male breadwinner model of the american family. when liberalism experienced those challenges, it went into a prolonged period of political crisis in the 60s and well into the 70 #s, and it's that critical historical moment that the conservative movement steps into the breach with liberalism in crisis and proposes a kind of new model of the american family, one that does not require comake support or economic assistance, but one that requires moral protection so the book really tells the story of the politicized american family going from the family that needs support economically to one that needs protection morally. that's how a characterize the shift from a liberal political culture to a more conservative political culture. the critical difference between the liberal, the previous -- the pre-1960 #s liberal model of the family and the post 1970s conservative m
in '94. >> i'm amazed at -- as was true in the civil rights struggle in the '60s how much deception, how much deliberate misstatement of reality is taking place in this debate. >> so amy, when you hear this comment and several others including the internet comment of david king, it seems the nra strategy is we're under siege. yesterday's executive action mentioned by joe biden, we know, set off a firestorm with some conservatives. how's there a reasonable conversation when an organization sees themselves as a victim, amy? >> i think the white house is that they have great respect for the 2nd amendment. >> every time the white house says that, you then have what i pointed to, others who say, yes, you are. how do you meet them in the middle? >> it's going to be hard. that's for sure. i mean, but i think they're going to have to meet in the middle. the person to do that is vice president biden. coming off the fiscal cliff debate. a lot of friends on the hill and the senate. maybe they can strike a balance. >> let me play bill clinton. a speech yesterday at the consumer electronics show in l
who she is and why you think she's such a good pick. >> she was formerly the wife of the slain civil rights leader medger everies in jackson mississippi, in front of his wife and children, by a back-shooting coward by the name of byron beckwith. she pursued the case for 30 years and got a brave attorney to take her case. it was made into movie called " "ghosts of mississippi." she has been a stalwart, stubborn, wonderful lady who dedicated herself to getting justice for her husband and finally got it. and remarkably this is the first time a non-clergymen or non-clergy person has been allowed to give the invocation at a presidential inaugural. i think it's terrific. i think it to put her in the spotlight is a great thing. >> jennifer: well, i think it is a great symbol as well, and i appreciate, as always, your insights, and you are one of our favorite columnists, so thank you, charlie for sharing with us. charlie pierce of "esquire" magazine. health insurance companies were given an inch. now they're taking a whole yard. they just cannot seem to help themselves. we'll hear about that
of that and of the civil rights movement i was just a junkie by the time i was 9-years-old i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy and when i was 10i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay running for the mayor of new york but i wouldn't work for him at the headquarters, i want to the liberal party come on new york you could run on to. i was handed out leaflets on the street corner in new york, and some woman felt this was cute this ely handing out leaflets, and she asked me why they make the case for lindsey and got an early start of my political career and made the case against the opponent as well. we to get back to the liberal party headquarters and open it up and there were all these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills and so in one of my early lessons in politics, the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnuts. [applause] >> you also sold a bumper stickers. >> those of us that have lived through it remember that is a time of great idealism and the campaign was infused with idealism as tragically as it ended, and wh
, fight. we are millions of people just like you. we are the longest standing civil rights organization in the u.s. of history's s patriots, prbotectors of the second amendment advocating the right to keep and bear arms. advancing the shooting sports. championing gun safety, education and training. creating a vital legacy by answering freedom's call. and we are growing stronger every day. we are the n.r.a. and the n.r.a. is you. host: that is from the n.r.a. two stories you can find online and front page of the leading newspapers. "new york times" looking at symbols of grief piling up. from the "washington post" broad strategy on guns being weighed far beyond the ban on assault weapons. they are on their websites. we will continue the conversation on the agenda ahead as lawmakers return the start of the 113th congress. president back in washington later t today. later, looking at just what members of congress earn, pensions and salary. we will have more with daniel shuman of the sunlight foundation. keeping track of other programs. good morning, nancy. >> good morning, steve. on today's
to ambassador hormel and any lgbt americans who may question my commitment to their civil rights. >> barbara starr is joining us right now. on that last point that you just made, i assume he is totally committed to making sure equal rights for gays and lesbians serving in the united states military will be fully honored, no going back to don't ask, don't tell or anything along those lines? >> well, that's absolutely right, wolf. when you are the secretary of defense in this country, you carry out the president's policies. this is mandatory. there's no choice on these matters. so by accepting the nomination and being willing to serve as secretary of defense, he will have to do this. in fact, many members of the gay and lesbian community are looking for additional rights to be granted to them when they are partners of either those serving in the military or in the military themselves. i think for most americans one of the -- besides all of the questions we've discussed here, what would lead to troops being taken into another conflict, into another war after so many years in iraq and afghanista
that complies with civil rights, but, of course, has an overriding effect of addressing public safety. we had a lot of testimony. we had a lot of speaking out proand con from law enforcement throughout the campaign in colorado about implications and whether moving towards legalization was better or worse than the status quo. i worked my own career in law enforcement and prosecution, there's disagreement. i mean i heard passionate disagreement from a lot of people i respect. well, one thing we have to do now is have a standard that protect people who visit our state and drive on the roads so people know that that's -- there is going to be a safe system for them, and we're not sure yet how to do that. our legislature has that as job one now in the new session that starts this week in colorado, and your point of vu, your input would be valuable in our state. >> against legalization in colorado; is that right? >> i was opposed to it. i also publicly predicted it would not pass. my credibility is nil. [laughter] >> i have to say i support this, and i predicted it to pass. [laughter] i think, you k
. >> that's right, educate about the closing process, the application process. >> reporter: andy schnegenberger showed us another neighborhood. first settled by freed slaved after the civil war. today working class families want to move in. schnegenberger directs fon profit groups like resources for communities which guide first-time buyers through the mortgage process. the folks that you typically deal with, give me a sense of who they are? >> so our member organizations work with families that are typically low to moderate income, you know, annual incomes of 30 to 50 to 60,000 dollars a year. >> reporter: the new rules are designed it to pro they can them from risky loans and the banks from borrowers taking a loan they cannot afford. they cap total debt payments at no more than 43% of a borrower's income. mandate a consumer's financial records be verified, ban interest only loans an limit large payments called balloons due at the end of a loan. but schnegenberger is also worried regulators could tinker with the rules by the end of the year. >> concerns about the details, for us
. but the worst of the storm is being felt in syria where civil war forced thousands to live in dire conditions in refugee camps and makeshift shelters without heat. a lost suffering for people already suffering. >>> all right. john. thank you. when we come back, a.j. hammer head of "showbiz tonight." we'll have announcement and reaction and insiders and the host himself. seth mcfarland will join us after the announcements are made.  >>> if we're going go, we need to go now. >> you feel right? the whole world is going want in on this. >> this moment, now, now, now! ♪ >> they got my wife and they sold her, but i don't know who took her. >> yes! whoo! >>> special coverage of the academy award nominations on "starting point" begins right now. ♪ >> morning, everybody. we're taking a live look from the samuel goldwyn theater. in beverly hills. welcome to our coverage. a.j. hammer is geg to help us out, he's the host of "showbiz tonight." on headline news. interesting, hard to say who will be nominated. >> the exciting thing for me, terrific movies, these are movies peo
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)